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Saturday, 24 December 2016

King John

Happy birthday King John www.localhistories.org/kingjohn.html  

Saturday, 17 December 2016

Friday, 16 December 2016

Jane Austen

I wrote a brief bio of Jane Austen. She was a famous writer of the early 19th century www.localhistories.org/austen.html  

Saturday, 10 December 2016

Women vote in Wyoming

In 1869 the Wyoming legislature passed a law giving women the right to vote. The governor signed it on 10 December 1869. http://www.localhistories.org/womenvotetime.html  

Tuesday, 6 December 2016

Monday, 28 November 2016

Thursday, 24 November 2016

Charles Darwin

On 24 November 1859 Charles Darwin published his great work, On the Origin of Species www.localhistories.org/darwin.html 

Sunday, 20 November 2016

Women Surgeons

Two women surgeons were recorded in London in 1593, Elinor Sneshell of Valenciennes in France, . Not all surgeons in 16th century London were men. If anyone needs a reference its in a book called Elizabeth's London by Liza Picard published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in 2003.

Friday, 12 August 2016

Tuesday, 19 July 2016

Mary Rose

On 19 July 1545 Henry VIII's warship the Mary Rose sank near Portsmouth. But it was raised from the sea bed in 1982. It is now a popular museum. www.localhistories.org/maryrose.html 

Monday, 18 July 2016

Sunday, 3 July 2016

Quebec

Happy birthday Quebec. Samuel de Champlain founded the city on 3 July 1608.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Coffee

According to legend coffee was discovered by an Ethiopian goat herd called Kaldi. He noticed that goats who ate certain beans became very lively. Coffee was drunk in Yemen by the 15th century. By the 16th century coffee had spread to Persia (Iran) and Turkey. There were many coffee houses where people could drink and also socialize.

Coffee reached Europe in the late 16th century through trade. Coffee was introduced into Italy first. In the 1600s coffee houses opened across Europe. www.localhistories.org/coffee.html 

Monday, 20 June 2016

Catherine Macaulay

Catherine Macaulay was a famous woman historian of the 18th century. Catherine was born into a wealthy family in Kent, England on 2 April 1731. She was privately educated. On 18 June 1760 she married Dr George Macaulay. Catherine wrote a great work called The History of England. It was in 8 volumes. The first volume was published in 1763 and the last in 1768. Catherine also wrote a book called Letters on Education in 1790. She argued for co-education of boys and girls. She also opposed slavery and capital punishment. Catherine died on 22 June 1791.

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

Magna Carta

On 15 June 1215 King John sealed Magna Carta. But we can never take our freedoms for granted. We must always be vigilant. www.localhistories.org/kingjohn.html 

Saturday, 11 June 2016

Friday, 10 June 2016

Salem

On 10 June 1692 the first person convicted of witchcraft was hanged at Salem, Massachusetts. It all began when young girls began accusing people of 'bewitching' them. Both men and women were hanged for witchcraft and a man named Giles Corey was pressed to death.  www.localhistories.org/salem.html 

Monday, 18 April 2016

Monday, 4 April 2016

20th century women

In 1918 in Britain women over 30 were allowed to vote (if they met a property qualification). More occupations were opened to women during the 20th century. In 1916 the first policewoman (with full powers) was appointed in Britain. The 1919 Sex Disqualification Removal Act allowed women to become lawyers, vets and civil servants. www.localhistories.org/womensrights.html 

Sunday, 3 April 2016

Greek Women

In a rich family the wife was expected to run the home and, sometimes, to manage the finances. However rich women would normally stay indoors and send slaves to do the shopping. Poor women, of course, had no choice. They might also have to help their husbands with farm work. Women, even rich ones, were expected to spin and weave cloth and make clothes. www.localhistories.org/greekwomen.html 

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Roman women's jobs

Roman women were allowed to own and inherit property and some ran businesses. (In the New Testament there is a woman named Lydia who sold purple cloth). In certain trades some women helped their husbands, especially in luxury trades like perfumery. Furthermore some women were priestesses or worked as midwives or hairdressers. www.localhistories.org/ancientwomen.html 

Monday, 21 March 2016

Women's work in the 19th century

In early 19th century Britain working conditions were often appalling but parliament passed laws to protect women and children. In 1842 a law banned women and boys under 10 from working underground. Then in 1847 a Factory Act said that women and children could only work 10 hours a day in textile factories. In 1867 the law was extended to all factories. (A factory was defined as a place where more than 50 people were employed in a manufacturing process). An act of 1878 said women in any factories could not work more than 56 hours a week.

www.localhistories.org/womensjobs.html 

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

International Women's Day

 For International Women's Day here is my video about famous women in history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grmTVzb5PCc

Queen Anne

On 8 March 1702 Queen Anne became queen of England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland. She was the first woman to rule Britain.

Sunday, 31 January 2016

Monday, 25 January 2016

Winter Olympics

Happy birthday Winter Olympics. The first ones opened on 25 January 1924 in France. www.localhistories.org/games.html