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Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Mary Seacole

Mary Seacole was a Jamaican nurse who treated sick and injured soldiers during the Crimean War. Mary Seacole was born Mary Jane Grant in Kingston Jamaica in 1805. (At that time Jamaica was part of the British Empire).  She traveled to Crimea herself in 1855. Mary ran a boarding house called the British Hotel. She also sold provisions and when she was not working there Mary worked tirelessly treating sick and injured soldiers. They called her Mother Seacole. When the war ended in 1856 Mary returned to England. In 1857 she wrote a book called Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole. www.localhistories.org/seacole.html 

Thursday, 21 April 2016

Monday, 18 April 2016

Saturday, 16 April 2016

Friday, 15 April 2016

Titanic

In the early hours of the morning on 15 April 1912 the Titanic sank with great loss of life www.localhistories.org/titanic.html 

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Margery Kempe

Margery Kempe was an English mystic of the Middle Ages. She is famous for her autobiography. www.localhistories.org/kempe.html 


Thursday, 7 April 2016

Julian of Norwich

Julian of Norwich 1342-1416 was a great Christian mystic and writer of the Middle Ages but little is known about her. www.localhistories.org/julian.html 

Wednesday, 6 April 2016

Monday, 4 April 2016

20th century women

In 1918 in Britain women over 30 were allowed to vote (if they met a property qualification). More occupations were opened to women during the 20th century. In 1916 the first policewoman (with full powers) was appointed in Britain. The 1919 Sex Disqualification Removal Act allowed women to become lawyers, vets and civil servants. www.localhistories.org/womensrights.html 

Sunday, 3 April 2016

Greek Women

In a rich family the wife was expected to run the home and, sometimes, to manage the finances. However rich women would normally stay indoors and send slaves to do the shopping. Poor women, of course, had no choice. They might also have to help their husbands with farm work. Women, even rich ones, were expected to spin and weave cloth and make clothes. www.localhistories.org/greekwomen.html 

Friday, 1 April 2016

Education for women in the 16th century and 17th century

In the early 16th century some upper class women were highly educated. Two of Henry VIII's wives, Katherine of Aragon and Catherine Parr were well educated. Queen Elizabeth I was also well educated and she liked reading. Wealthy girls learned music and dancing and needlework. They also learned to read and write and they learned languages like Greek and Latin, Spanish, Italian and French.