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Friday, 30 December 2016

Happy New Year

Happy New Year everybody! www.localhistories.org/newyear.html  

Rasputin

Rasputin was murdered on 30 December 1916 www.localhistories.org/rasputin.html  

Tuesday, 27 December 2016

Monday, 19 December 2016

Saturday, 17 December 2016

Friday, 16 December 2016

Jane Austen

I wrote a brief bio of Jane Austen. She was a famous writer of the early 19th century www.localhistories.org/austen.html  

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Saturday, 10 December 2016

Women vote in Wyoming

In 1869 the Wyoming legislature passed a law giving women the right to vote. The governor signed it on 10 December 1869. http://www.localhistories.org/womenvotetime.html  

Friday, 9 December 2016

John Milton

John Milton was born on 9 December 1608. He was a great writer but also a defender of freedom of speech www.localhistories.org/johnmilton.html 

Monday, 28 November 2016

Thursday, 24 November 2016

Charles Darwin

On 24 November 1859 Charles Darwin published his great work, On the Origin of Species www.localhistories.org/darwin.html 

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Monday, 21 November 2016

Sunday, 20 November 2016

Women Surgeons

Two women surgeons were recorded in London in 1593, Elinor Sneshell of Valenciennes in France, . Not all surgeons in 16th century London were men. If anyone needs a reference its in a book called Elizabeth's London by Liza Picard published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in 2003.

Thursday, 17 November 2016

Queen Mary

On 17 November Queen Mary died. She was the first woman to rule the whole of England www.localhistories.org/mary.html

Monday, 14 November 2016

Who invented the elevated railway?

Its debatable if anyone can be said to have 'invented' the elevated railway. It is, after all merely a railway raised above ground level. However the first elevated railway was in London. It was completed in 1838. The first elevated railway in New York was built in 1868. www.localhistories.org/transport.html  

Thursday, 10 November 2016

Who invented the fire escape?

A man named Daniel Maseres invented the fire escape in 1784. During the 19th century better and better fires escapes were patented. Nevertheless Mr Maseres was the pioneer so he should be remembered. www.localhistories.org/firefighting.html 

Monday, 7 November 2016

Marie Curie

The great scientist Marie Curie was born on 7 November 1867 (She was born Maria Sklodowska in Warsaw, Poland www.localhistories.org/curie.html 

Friday, 4 November 2016

Paper bags

The first machine for making paper bags was invented by a man named Francis Wolle in 1852. http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/paperbag.htm 

Who invented the circular saw?

An interesting article about who invented the circular saw http://ronin-group.org/shop_circular_saw_history.html 

Hungarian Uprising 1956

On 4 November 1956 Communists brutally put down a revolution in Hungary. Soviet aircraft bombed the capital, Budapest and Soviet tanks and troops poured in. The Hungarians had to wait 33 years for their freedom. www.localhistories.org/hungary.html  

Thursday, 27 October 2016

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Norway

Happy birthday Norway. On 26 October 1905 Sweden recognized Norwegian independence. www.localhistories.org/norway.html 

Monday, 24 October 2016

HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior Britain's first iron warship launched in 1860. Photo by Bea Mendyk

Quisling

On 24 October 1945 the Norwegian traitor Vidkun Qusiling who ran a puppet government under the Nazis was hanged. For a time quisling was a synonym for traitor but that seems to have died out. www.localhistories.org/norway.html  

Thursday, 20 October 2016

Friday, 14 October 2016

Catherine Parr

I wrote a brief biography of Catherine Parr. She is famous as the 6th wife of Henry VIII and she was an erudite and capable woman. www.localhistories.org/parr.html

Saturday, 8 October 2016

Chicago

Chicago was devastated by a fire in 1871. The Chicago fire began on the evening of 8 October in a barn. According to legend it was caused by a cow knocking over a lamp. At any rate the fire spread through Downtown Chicago where houses were made of wood and it burned until 10 October. About 100,000 people, about one third of the population were made homeless and about 300 people were killed. www.localhistories.org/chicago.html 

Friday, 7 October 2016

Bess of Hardwick

I wrote about Bess of Hardwick. She was a very rich woman in 16th century England. She is famous for her great house Hardwick Hall. www.localhistories.org/bess.html

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Queen Elizabeth I

You often hear that the last words of Elizabeth I were 'All my possessions for a moment of time' In fact there is no evidence she ever said that and nobody knows what her last words were. I found this interesting quiz of myths about Elizabeth I. See how many you can get right! http://www.elizabethi.org/contents/myths/index6.html 

Friday, 26 August 2016

Women in the Middle Ages

I wrote about women in the Middle Ages. There were many strong and capable women in the Middle Ages. In that era women had to work hard just to survive. www.localhistories.org/middlgeageswomen.html 

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Monday, 15 August 2016

Friday, 12 August 2016

Monday, 8 August 2016

Tycho Brahe

On 8 August 1576 work began on building an observatory for Tycho Brahe the great Danish astronomer www.localhistories.org/brahe.html

Saturday, 6 August 2016

Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Insulin

On 27 July 1921 Frederick Banting and Charles Best isolated insulin at the University of Toronto

Tuesday, 19 July 2016

Mary Rose

On 19 July 1545 Henry VIII's warship the Mary Rose sank near Portsmouth. But it was raised from the sea bed in 1982. It is now a popular museum. www.localhistories.org/maryrose.html 

Monday, 18 July 2016

Sunday, 3 July 2016

Quebec

Happy birthday Quebec. Samuel de Champlain founded the city on 3 July 1608.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Coffee

According to legend coffee was discovered by an Ethiopian goat herd called Kaldi. He noticed that goats who ate certain beans became very lively. Coffee was drunk in Yemen by the 15th century. By the 16th century coffee had spread to Persia (Iran) and Turkey. There were many coffee houses where people could drink and also socialize.

Coffee reached Europe in the late 16th century through trade. Coffee was introduced into Italy first. In the 1600s coffee houses opened across Europe. www.localhistories.org/coffee.html 

Monday, 20 June 2016

Catherine Macaulay

Catherine Macaulay was a famous woman historian of the 18th century. Catherine was born into a wealthy family in Kent, England on 2 April 1731. She was privately educated. On 18 June 1760 she married Dr George Macaulay. Catherine wrote a great work called The History of England. It was in 8 volumes. The first volume was published in 1763 and the last in 1768. Catherine also wrote a book called Letters on Education in 1790. She argued for co-education of boys and girls. She also opposed slavery and capital punishment. Catherine died on 22 June 1791.

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

Magna Carta

On 15 June 1215 King John sealed Magna Carta. But we can never take our freedoms for granted. We must always be vigilant. www.localhistories.org/kingjohn.html 

Saturday, 11 June 2016

Friday, 10 June 2016

Salem

On 10 June 1692 the first person convicted of witchcraft was hanged at Salem, Massachusetts. It all began when young girls began accusing people of 'bewitching' them. Both men and women were hanged for witchcraft and a man named Giles Corey was pressed to death.  www.localhistories.org/salem.html 

Monday, 30 May 2016

Saturday, 28 May 2016

Guillotine

Happy birthday Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, born 28 May 1738. He proposed that there should be a swift and humane method of executing people in France. The French Assembly agreed to his idea in 1791 and the first decapitating device was built. The first person to be executed by the new machine was Nicolas Jacques Pelletier in 1792. The guillotine was last used in France in 1977. www.localhistories.org/pun.html

Wednesday, 18 May 2016

Saxon Food

Saxon women brewed beer. Another Saxon drink was mead, made from fermented honey. (Honey was very important to the Saxons as there was no sugar for sweetening food. Bees were kept in every village). Upper class Saxons sometimes drank wine. The women cooked in iron cauldrons over open fires or in pottery vessels. They also made butter and cheese. Saxons ate from wooden bowls. 

Saxons were fond of meat and fish. However meat was a luxury and only the rich could eat it frequently. The ordinary people usually ate plain food such as bread, cheese and eggs. They ate not just chickens eggs but eggs from ducks, geese and wild birds. www.localhistories.org/food.html  

Monday, 16 May 2016

Chocolate

Chocolate is made from the fruit of the cocoa tree, which is native to Central America. It grows large round fruits containing seeds or beans, which are used to make chocolate. However for centuries people drank chocolate rather than ate it. People in Central America drank chocolate as early as 1,500 BC. Much later the Mayans and the Aztecs drank chocolate. The Aztecs called it xocolatl from which are word chocolate is derived. After the Spanish conquered Central America they bought cocoa beans back to Europe. The beans were roasted and ground and used to make a drink with hot water. The Spanish added sugar to make it taste sweeter and they stirred it with a wooden stick to make it foamy. At first chocolate was drunk only in Spain but in the 17th century chocolate spread from Spain to the rest of Europe. www.localhistories.org/chocolate.html 

Sunday, 8 May 2016

Joan of Arc

On 8 May 1429 the French, inspired by Joan of Arc broke the English siege of Orleans. It was a turning point in the Hundred Years War which ended with England losing all territory in France except Calais. www.localhistories.org/joan.html 

Monday, 2 May 2016

Catherine the Great

On 2 May 1729 Catherine the Great was born. She was empress of Russia 1762-1796. She was not the first woman to rule Russia but she was a formidable leader. She put down a rebellion and she enlarged Russia's borders. www.localhistories.org/catherine.html 

Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Mary Seacole

Mary Seacole was a Jamaican nurse who treated sick and injured soldiers during the Crimean War. Mary Seacole was born Mary Jane Grant in Kingston Jamaica in 1805. (At that time Jamaica was part of the British Empire).  She traveled to Crimea herself in 1855. Mary ran a boarding house called the British Hotel. She also sold provisions and when she was not working there Mary worked tirelessly treating sick and injured soldiers. They called her Mother Seacole. When the war ended in 1856 Mary returned to England. In 1857 she wrote a book called Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole. www.localhistories.org/seacole.html 

Thursday, 21 April 2016

Monday, 18 April 2016

Saturday, 16 April 2016

Friday, 15 April 2016

Titanic

In the early hours of the morning on 15 April 1912 the Titanic sank with great loss of life www.localhistories.org/titanic.html 

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Margery Kempe

Margery Kempe was an English mystic of the Middle Ages. She is famous for her autobiography. www.localhistories.org/kempe.html 


Thursday, 7 April 2016

Julian of Norwich

Julian of Norwich 1342-1416 was a great Christian mystic and writer of the Middle Ages but little is known about her. www.localhistories.org/julian.html 

Wednesday, 6 April 2016

Monday, 4 April 2016

20th century women

In 1918 in Britain women over 30 were allowed to vote (if they met a property qualification). More occupations were opened to women during the 20th century. In 1916 the first policewoman (with full powers) was appointed in Britain. The 1919 Sex Disqualification Removal Act allowed women to become lawyers, vets and civil servants. www.localhistories.org/womensrights.html 

Sunday, 3 April 2016

Greek Women

In a rich family the wife was expected to run the home and, sometimes, to manage the finances. However rich women would normally stay indoors and send slaves to do the shopping. Poor women, of course, had no choice. They might also have to help their husbands with farm work. Women, even rich ones, were expected to spin and weave cloth and make clothes. www.localhistories.org/greekwomen.html 

Friday, 1 April 2016

Education for women in the 16th century and 17th century

In the early 16th century some upper class women were highly educated. Two of Henry VIII's wives, Katherine of Aragon and Catherine Parr were well educated. Queen Elizabeth I was also well educated and she liked reading. Wealthy girls learned music and dancing and needlework. They also learned to read and write and they learned languages like Greek and Latin, Spanish, Italian and French.

Monday, 28 March 2016

Women's work in the Middle Ages

In Saxon Times life for women was hard, rough and usually short. Upper class Saxon women had considerable freedom. Saxon women were allowed to own and inherit property and to make contracts. However most Saxon women had to work hard spinning and weaving, preparing food and drink and performing other tasks.
www.localhistories.org/womensjobs.html  

Friday, 25 March 2016

History of Easter

The name Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon name for April, Eostermunath. It means the month of beginnings. www.localhistories.org/easter.html 


Thursday, 24 March 2016

Ancient Egyptian Women

In Ancient Egypt women had a great deal of freedom. They could come and go as they pleased. They could own property and they could sign contracts. However most women worked in the home. There was a great deal of work to do as most homes were largely self-sufficient. The woman made the families clothes and prepared food such as grinding grain to flour to make bread. In a rich family the woman was kept busy organizing the slaves.

The Egyptians had a goddess of reading and writing called Seshat. www.localhistories.org/egypt.html 

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Roman women's jobs

Roman women were allowed to own and inherit property and some ran businesses. (In the New Testament there is a woman named Lydia who sold purple cloth). In certain trades some women helped their husbands, especially in luxury trades like perfumery. Furthermore some women were priestesses or worked as midwives or hairdressers. www.localhistories.org/ancientwomen.html 

Monday, 21 March 2016

Women's work in the 19th century

In early 19th century Britain working conditions were often appalling but parliament passed laws to protect women and children. In 1842 a law banned women and boys under 10 from working underground. Then in 1847 a Factory Act said that women and children could only work 10 hours a day in textile factories. In 1867 the law was extended to all factories. (A factory was defined as a place where more than 50 people were employed in a manufacturing process). An act of 1878 said women in any factories could not work more than 56 hours a week.

www.localhistories.org/womensjobs.html 

Friday, 18 March 2016

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

International Women's Day

 For International Women's Day here is my video about famous women in history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grmTVzb5PCc

Queen Anne

On 8 March 1702 Queen Anne became queen of England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland. She was the first woman to rule Britain.

Saturday, 5 March 2016

Monday, 22 February 2016

Last invasion of Britain

On 22 February 1797 the last invasion of mainland Britain took place.The French landed near Fishguard in Wales but they soon surrendered.www.localhistories.org/wales.html 

Friday, 19 February 2016

Copernicus

On 19 February 1473 Nicolaus Copernicus the man who realised the Earth orbits the Sun was born www.localhistories.org/copernicus.html 

Thursday, 18 February 2016

Pluto

Happy birthday Pluto. It was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh on 18 February 1930. (The name Pluto was suggested by an 11 year old girl called Venetia Burney). www.localhistories.org/outerplanets.html 

Wednesday, 17 February 2016

Friday, 12 February 2016

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Captain Scott

On 10 February 1913 the bodies of Captain Scott and his companions were found in Antarctica www.localhistories.org/scott.html 

Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Pancakes

Pancakes were invented because people were not allowed to eat eggs or butter during Lent. They used up the last of them by making pancakes. Its Shrove Tuesday because shrive meant absolve a sinner of his sins. People confessed to a priest and were 'shriven' before Lent. www.localhistories.org/desserts.html  

Monday, 8 February 2016

Catherine I

On 8 February 1725 Catherine I became the first woman to rule Russia. She ruled till 1727. Other women were Anna (1730-1740), Elizabeth (1741-1762) and of course Catherine the Great (1762-1796). She was one of the most powerful women rulers in history. www.localhistories.org/russia.html  

Sunday, 31 January 2016

Wednesday, 27 January 2016

Monday, 25 January 2016

Winter Olympics

Happy birthday Winter Olympics. The first ones opened on 25 January 1924 in France. www.localhistories.org/games.html  

Sunday, 17 January 2016

Captain Cook

On 17 January 1773 Captain Cook became the first man to cross the Antarctic Circle. www.localhistories.org/cook.html 

Friday, 15 January 2016

Saturday, 9 January 2016

Income Tax

On 9 January 1799 British prime minister William Pitt introduced income tax. It was set at 10%. As they say nothing in life is certain except death and taxes.

Friday, 8 January 2016

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Egyptian parties

For entertainment the Egyptians loved parties. If a rich person invited you to a feast, singers, musicians, dancers, jugglers, wrestlers and jesters would entertain you. Musicians played wooden flutes, harps, lutes, drums and clappers. At a rich person's banquet guests were given a cone of perfumed fat to put on their heads. It slowly melted leaving the wearer smelling nice. www.localhistories.org/games.html  

Monday, 4 January 2016

Rose Heilbron

On 4 January 1972 Rose Heilbron became the first woman judge at the Old Bailey (The central criminal court in London) www.localhistories.org/womanfamoushist.html